SMA 2021-2022 Courses

Ancient Literature

In this course, we turn back to the sources of Western thought – Great Books of Ancient Greece and Rome – to learn what we can from our cultural ancestors. The Ancients are by no means irrelevant to our world; they were more advanced than we are in many ways. By studying these works through weekly seminars and self-designed papers, students in this course begin to understand what part they play in the Great Tradition.

Booklist:

  • The Odyssey, Homer
  • Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Meno, Crito, Phaedo, Plato
  • Oedipus Rex, Antigone, Sophocles
  • Nicomachean Ethics, Politics, Metaphysics, Aristotle
  • The Aeneid, Virgil
  • The Consolation of Philosophy, Boethius
Ancient Literature

Course description coming soon.

Theology- Intro to Philosophy and Scripture

1st Semester – Intro to the Philosophy of the Human Person – This course introduces the complexity of our creation, giving context to the human person while attempting to answer life’s questions about who we are and why we are here.  We explore our creation in the Image and Likeness of God by defining and understanding dignity, soul, passion, intellect, morality, and will. We will critically examine the modern confusion and distortions related to the dignity and nature of the human person.  Reading: Catholic Bible, Catechism, excerpts from various authors: Cicero, Aquinas, Guardini, Hildebrand, Wojtyla (Pope St. John Paul), Crosby, etc.

2nd Semester – Sacred Scripture – This course presents an overview of Sacred Scripture, focusing on providing a clear framework for understanding the narrative of Salvation History and the development of basic principles of biblical interpretation. While an in-depth study of every book of the Bible is beyond the scope of a semester course, key books, events, and figures are examined in detail with an emphasis on Jesus Christ and His Paschal Mystery as the culmination of God’s plan of salvation and the interpretive key for understanding both the Old and New Testaments.

Booklist:

  • Sophia Press – Spirit of Truth Sacred Scripture
  • Catholic Bible
  • Catechism
  • Scott Hanh’s A Father Who Keeps His Promises
Latin

This course is designed for the enthusiastic and disciplined learner. It is a grammar-based course with students reading original and edited works by the Ancients from day one. It is structured to follow an advanced High School curriculum; Latin I and II the first two years, Latin III – Selected Authors (or UWHS 103), and Latin IV – Caesar & Vergil (Advanced Placement).

Booklist:

  • Wheelock’s Latin, 7th Edition
  • Workbook for Wheelock’s Latin, 3rd Edition, Revised
Geometry

Geometry is available to qualifying middle and high school students. As part of St. Monica’s Walk to Math program, this course uses Saxon Geometry. Saxon’s classic “spiral” approach means that mathematical concepts are not segregated by chapter as is typical in traditional math courses. This constant review is beneficial within a Geometry course as it provides a natural bridge between Algebra I and Algebra II. Throughout the course, Geometry students will constantly be building upon concepts introduced in Algebra I (ex: simplifying radicals, factoring, and solving algebraic expressions) while entering the world of Euclid’s Geometry. By the end of the course, students will also be introduced to Algebra II foundations such as graphing linear functions, matrices, and trigonometry.

Booklist:

  • Saxon Geometry
  • Excerpts from the Sacred Geometry portion of the Quadrivium
Algebra II

In this course, students will learn about the beauties and truths of numbers. Algebra is the branch of mathematics concerned with manipulating numbers and variables and their mixture through the study of polynomials. In Algebra II, we strengthen the foundations for all other advanced mathematics. By learning the rules of the language of mathematics, students will be able to harness the power of abstraction. They will know how to convert problems from the English language to mathematical sentences (expressions, equations, and inequalities) and back. Along the way, we will hope to understand the world of Mathematics in the context of its long and deep history. In mathematics, we discover a reflection of the order, rationality, and immutability found in God’s own divine nature. For, life—this created world—is good.

Booklist:

  • Into Algebra 2 ©2020
  • Selections from Euclid’s Elements and Democritus
Biology

In this course, students will familiarize themselves with the emergence and continuation of biology’s modern scientific enterprise. They will widen their understanding of the world around them. In contextualizing and encountering primary texts, students will develop a holistic understanding of the world of biological studies. Like all other disciplines, biology is a rich and living conversation, not a static collection of facts. Students will hone the same thought and observation tools by encountering great biologists’ original writings and experiments throughout history. They will also begin to critique the nature of the modern scientific inquiry thoughtfully. They may hope to recover and reconcile with modern science the world’s vision articulated by the ancient Natural Philosophers: wonderous, beautiful, and worth understanding for its own sake. For, this created world is good.

Booklist:

  • 9th Grade Biology Manual
  • Modern Biology
Chemistry

Course description coming soon.